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Resolutions 2018-01-16T08:21:47+00:00

Past Year’s Resolutions

How to Write a Resolution

Definition Requirements

A resolution is a formal expression of opinion, will, or intent by an official body or assembled group; a declaration submitted to an assembly for adoption. All NCDP resolutions must be in writing, preferably in electronic form as a Microsoft Word document. Handwritten or verbal resolutions will not be accepted for consideration.

Submission of Resolutions and Platforms

At the precinct meetings, Resolutions will be proposed, considered, and adopted. Once they are adopted, the Precinct Secretary will pass them onto the County Secretary.

The County Secretary is to report the approved resolutions from all precincts, in the county, to the County Convention. The delegates are to vote on the Resolutions and are to be prioritized at the County Convention. The County Secretary is to certify and submit the Resolutions to the appropriate District Secretary(ies) within ten (10) days. The Resolutions from the counties that are not prioritized are to be passed on to the State Resolution and Platform Committee.

The District Secretaries are to report all the Resolutions from the counties to the District Convention. The delegates are to vote on the Resolutions and are to be prioritized at the District Convention. The District Secretary is to report them to the State Chair in five (5) days and the State Resolutions and Platform committee in ten (10) days.

Structure of Resolutions

A resolution usually is written  in four parts: a succinct title, a preamble, a resolving clause (or  clauses), and a submission statement.

Title

A succinct title reflecting the content of the resolution should appear centered and in capital letters. The resolution title should begin with the words “A RESOLUTION …”

Example

“A RESOLUTION CALLING FOR A STYLE GUIDE FOR FUTURE RESOLUTIONS”

Preamble

A preamble is a brief statement of background or rationale coming before the resolving clause(s). The purpose of a preamble is to provide information without which the point or the merits of a resolution are likely to be poorly understood, or where unusual importance is attached to making certain reasons for an action a matter of record, or the like.

Although it is not mandatory to include a preamble with every resolution, the inclusion of such information usually strengthens the understanding and importance of the resolution. However, a preamble generally should contain no more clauses than are strictly necessary. Too many clauses often detract from the force of the resolution.

Structure

WHEREAS, The … (text of the first preamble clause); and WHEREAS, … (text of the next to the last preamble clause); and WHEREAS, … (text of the last preamble clause); now, therefore, be it

Example

WHEREAS, Resolutions are an important part of the North Carolina Democratic Party and its proceedings; and

WHEREAS, The process for writing a resolution for consideration by the North Carolina Democratic Party is unclear; and

WHEREAS, Members of the North Carolina Democratic Party would find a guide to writing resolutions useful in their activism; now, therefore, be it

Resolving Clauses

A resolving clause indicates what action(s) is to be taken given the “WHEREAS” clause(s) in the preamble. Each resolving clause, written as a separate paragraph, begins with the word “RESOLVED” followed by a comma and the word “that” with a capital “T.” If there is more than one resolving clause, each of  them should begin with the words “RESOLVED, that” just as in the first resolving clause. However the final resolved clause can begin with “BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, That,” but this is optional

Structure

RESOLVED, That … (stating action to be taken); RESOLVED, That … (stating further action to be taken); and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, That … (stating the last action to be taken).

Example

RESOLVED That the North Carolina Democratic Party staff will consult Roberts Rules o Order and other documents to gain an understanding of the resolution-writing process; and

RESOLVED, That the State Party staff will produce a style guide to writing resolutions to be considered by the precinct, county, district, and State Executive Committees; and,

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, That we Democrats commit our actions, time, ideas, energy, treasury and prayers toward ensuring electoral success for Democrats up and down the ballot henceforth and forevermore.

Submission Statement

At the end of the resolution, the following submission statement must be included to clarify who is submitting the resolution and to which body it is being submitted:

Structure

Submitted to the [name of Party Entity] by [Person(s) submitting the resolution and county] [Date]

Example

Submitted to the Fourth Congressional District Executive Committee by Mr. John Democrat, Donkey County March 12, 2018

SAMPLE RESOLUTION

A RESOLUTION CALLING FOR A STYLE GUIDE FOR FUTURE RESOLUTIONS

WHEREAS, Resolutions are an important part of the North Carolina Democratic Party and its proceedings; and

WHEREAS, There are various templates used to write resolutions in state, local and international government; and

WHEREAS, The process for writing a resolution for consideration by the North Carolina Democratic Party is unclear; and

WHEREAS, Members of the North Carolina Democratic Party would find a guide to writing resolutions useful in their activism; now, therefore, be it

RESOLVED That the North Carolina will consult Roberts’ Rules of Order and other documents to gain an understanding of the resolution-writing process; and

RESOLVED, That the State Party staff will produce a style guide to writing resolutions to be considered by the precinct, county, district, and State Executive Committees; and,

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, That we Democrats commit our actions, time, ideas, energy, treasury and prayers toward ensuring electoral success for Democrats up and down the ballot henceforth and forevermore.

Submitted to the Fourth Congressional District Executive Committee by Mr. John Democrat, Donkey County

March 12, 2015

Informative Sources